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Cloud Cap Marine
Cloud Cap

Delivery Day

January 26, 2011


Like a nervous mother hen, I did all the little details, had Mikey P show up to help get her cleaned up and on the trailer, and sent the most recent project out the shop door and into the cruel, cruel world. She's done, has seen the light of day, and is now happily residing at the Spokane National Boat Show.

There were some tribulations with paint that wouldn't cure, a couple rough spots that I wasn't pleased with, but having the show mere hours away, there wasn't time to iron it all out. So without further ado, here she is in full regalia, headed to a new life.

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Of course there's more I'd like to do to get the details perfect, but that's up to her new owner if he'd like to bring her back for the tidying up, or if he wants to get involved as a wood boat wonk and play with his himself. In the sun the extra effort involed in making her capable of wearing shiny paint worth it. It does pop in a whole different way than matte paints offer. The pure stainless bits dressed her up, and though the hawse pipes are a pain in the ass to put in, they do look great.

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Using the tarp for Cloud Cap to deliver, she went on the owner's trailer and down to the fairgrounds for the show. Some of the other yacht club members came out for the delivery/unveiling and to help get her moved inside for the show. This boat has been, and always will be, one that generates smiles on everyone who sees the design.

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An interesting find was the hawse pipes make great carrying handles for her, so I recommend them for those that will hand launch her.

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Timelines were tight, weather unforgiving, materials occasionally uncooperative, but with a great buyer and a fun set of plans, the job was a blast and I'm looking forward to the next project that drifts into the shop. For a few weeks, I'll be working on our other boats, doing some SWMBO projects, and otherwise relaxing a bit before the weather improves and we get busy again. Keep checking back, there should be plenty to see and read about in the coming few months.

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Prime time

January 11, 2011


Every waking second, if I'm not at work or running some sort of parts run or taking care of Lake Spokane Association business, it's been all shop, all the time. The looming deadline (I hate that word) means that every ounce of time correllates to work being done on the tug, as every inch of the boat has detail work to do. First thing in the timeline, the cabin finally dropped in permenantly.

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She's got some sweet lines at this point, and I like the look of this boat better than the first one I built.

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The trim came together in a different way than I had originally planned, but the boat sometimes evolves its own personality as it comes together. The trim has great balance forward without running by the breasthook, and the more I look at it the more I like it. Two screws were needed to retain it, but I think it was worth the extra little bit of work.

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After ironing out the moody parts of the trim forward, everything was masked, it was time to head to the shop in 12 degree weather this morning and get to the task of priming her down, two coats, by the end of the day. I do have to say, it went down well, and I think all the fairing work early on is going to shine through.

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I use the System 3 Yacht Primer, which can be hot coated two hours apart in 77 degree weather. It isn't that warm here, but the materials were toasted with infrared heat up to the temps needed.

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Now if that trim doesn't pop, I don't know what does...

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Here's a close shot of the notched transom, specifically cut for the 2hp Honda outboard this boat will have hung on her. This should also ease the entry and exit of kids who play on the boat at events

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Isn't this just the jauntiest little cabin? There will be some matching African mahogany seats over the open boxes (built while paint is curing) which will finish the interior, not to mention the new owner has a neat little wheel to be added.

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You might find a little hiatus in the coming week for site updates. A little family business needs to be attended to this week, but we will be back with a vengeance next Thursday.

Tight Timeline

January 8, 2011


For those of you who follow on the forums, most know I sustained a mild eye injury due to a lack of eye protection, some sanded epoxy balls, and a trip to the clinic for a close look at my eyes. The good news is no sustained long term damage. The better news is I was put off duty for a shift from work (too much infection risk), and given an extra day in the shop to get caught up and move as far forward as I can.

Weighing the options, I made the call to add the fairing filler and do as much work simultaneously as I can. This was heavily assisted by a good friend down the lake who has stepped up to help out, coming in before he goes to work to put a few hours down on the sander or helping do woodwork. He's had some training in auto body work, and it is paying in spades.

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Here he is, helping do the fitting and setup of the cabin in the hull.

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Admittedly, this thing is absurdly cute for its' size, and will surely bring many smiles out when she's used at the boat show or on local lakes.

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The cabin is all African mahogany with panels of okoume mahogany. The panels will be painted and all dimensional lumber will be bright finished using Cetol for minimal maintenance and longevity.

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I was caught inside the cabin doing a little fit and finish inspection by the cameraman. This does give a sense of scale to this boat, which only measures 9 feet at her longest, 4 feet wide at the beam, and less than 5 feet tall from keel to cabin roof.

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Speaking with the buyer, we had a slight miscommunication with completion dates, and the timeline tightened up even more. This has made it critical to get any task possible done with any scrap of available time. I do still have a regular full time job, volunteer organizations, and family time taking up their fair share. That in mind, I took an extra 45 minutes before we were due in town to cut up some more 1/2" x 1" stock to create the gunnel trim.

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The dimensions are slightly different than the design calls for, but using thicker plywood and making a stiffer structure using some different scantlings, this will work out very well. Clamped up, it makes for a much boatier looking vessel than my previous build, which was smooth and used less trim by a longshot.

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Lastly, the cabin has been glued, trimmed, and is only a few steps away from becoming one with the boat permanently.

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3 hard work days remain until a short break for family events. There will be a meeting tomorrow morning that might allow the buyer to do his own paint work to shorten the deadline, but there are no definite decisions.

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